Auronum

Live prices
  • Gold £1,896.44 oz 0.19%
  • Silver £22.62 oz 0.47%
  • Platinum £796.80 oz 0.00%
Gold 0.19%
£1,896.44 oz
Silver 0.47%
£22.62 oz
Platinum 0.00%
£796.80 oz
Gold 0.19%
£1,896.44 oz
Silver 0.47%
£22.62 oz
Platinum 0.00%
£22.62 oz
George 4th Gold coins

George IV Sovereigns



T he George IV Gold Sovereigns are held in high regard and trade at a high premium. George IV had two different portraits on his Gold Sovereigns, one known as the 'Laureate Head' and the other coined the 'Bare Head' design

 

George IV sovereigns are one of the more difficult to source Gold Sovereigns and command a premium to reflect this fact. The age of the coins means that even when a George IV Sovereign is offered for sale, it can be quite difficult finding one that was not mounted in jewellery or polished. There was a time when it was popular to parade these beautiful Sovereigns in necklaces, which has since devalued the coins as collectors demand coins as close to their original state as possible and do not want pieces that show rim damage from jewellery mounts or highly reflective and scuffed surfaces from cleaning by a jeweller's polishing wheel

George IV Sovereigns

Laureate Head Sovereigns
(1821 to 1825)



King George IV, the son of George III, first featured on the Gold Sovereign in 1821 which was the year that Great Britain went onto a Gold standard. 1821 was also the coronation year of George 4th which makes the 1821 sovereign a significant coin in Great British history

The same design was to be struck on George IV's Sovereigns for another four years. The design was then changed at the King's request as he favoured himself being portrayed as a youthful and slim figure rather than the overweight individual that he was reported to be at the time

George IV Sovereigns

Bare Head Sovereigns
(1825 to 1830)



An unusual move at the time, George IV had two different portraits placed onto his Sovereigns during his reign. The reason for this is the King wanted a more flattering look to his portrait which led to the effigy known as the 'bare head' design. It is obvious that the second portrait shows a slimmer version of the King

The standard George and Dragon design was replaced with a Royal Arms shield, which was an important development at the time because the successor to George IV's throne, William IV, kept the tradition of displaying a shield on the reverse of the Sovereign. Early Queen Victoria Sovereigns also used the shield back Sovereign design too

 
0
Spend £300.00 more to get free GB shipping
Your Cart is empty!

It looks like you haven't added any items to your cart yet.

Browse Products
Join Waitlist We will inform you when the product arrives in stock. Please leave your valid email address below